Your Favorite Things: Lydia Schmitt and Pablo Picasso’s The Studio

lydia3Lydia Schmitt and Pablo Picasso’s The Studio

This is the second installment of a new series in which students, community members, and staff share their favorite works at the IU Art Museum. This week’s feature is by Lydia Schmitt, a freshman at IU Bloomington majoring in Arts Management with minors in Art History and English. Lydia selected Pablo Picasso’s oil painting The Studio (1934), which is on permanent display in the museum’s first floor Gallery of the Art of the Western World. Here is what she had to say:

I vividly remember the first time I saw it. It was welcome week of my freshman year and my friends and I had spent the whole day exploring IU’s campus when I finally convinced them to go to the art museum with me. I was pumped to see what the museum had and they were excited for the air conditioning.

I could hardly contain my excitement as we explored the different galleries. We passed different pieces, each of us trying to recall facts we had learned in art history classes. I remember thinking it couldn’t get any better, and then I saw it. We were rounding the end of the first floor exhibit and as my friends and I were joking about Marcel Duchamp’s urinal (Duchamp’s famous Readymade statue, The Fountain), I caught a glimpse. I couldn’t even believe it. A Picasso? Here? I made a beeline for it.

I stood in front of The Studio mouth agape while my friends quickly followed behind me. A choir of “I don’t see it” ascended. “Well look at this, and this, and look at how these connect to make this,” I explained while frantically gesturing with my arms trying to make them get it. After every explanation I tried to give, I kept seeing new parts of the painting connect. It was like building a puzzle. I was mystified and would have been able to sit there the rest of the day just figuring it out and piecing it together.

Months later, and I am still entranced by Picasso’s The Studio. What an amazing blessing it is to have such impressive pieces here at Indiana University’s art museum. I frequently visit the museum just to sit and stare at this painting. It’s like visiting an old friend but I’m still able to learn something new about it every time.

Many thanks to Lydia for her contribution. If you would like to share your favorite work, please contact Abe Morris, the IU Art Museum’s Manager of Public Relations and Marketing, at: abamorri@iu.edu

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Your Favorite Things: Sasha Sokolchik and Mountain Landscape with Travelers

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This is the first installment of a new series where students, community members, and staff share their favorite works at the IU Art Museum. This week’s feature is by Alexandra “Sasha” Sokolchik, a freshman at Indiana University Bloomington majoring in Economic Consulting. Sasha selected Mountain Landscape with Travelers, a large oil painting on canvas, attributed to Jan Hackaert (Netherlandish, 1628-in or after 1685), and Adriaen van de Velde (Netherlandish, 1636-1672), located in the museum’s first floor Gallery of the Art of the Western World. Here is what Sasha had to say:

What I love most about this painting is how small it makes me feel. Not insignificant, but rather, all of my problems become so trivial, so irrelevant.  My world expands and I am reminded of the bigger painting all around me. I will not be here in a hundred years and I cannot say with certainty how much longer our world will look the way it does today, how long these trees will stay rooted, or these mountains unbroken, but I do know that life will continue no matter the form it decides to take.

I am brought back to reality every time I take in Mountain Landscape with Travelers, remembering that this life is about simplicity. Without bounds, it is everlasting yet I find myself caught up in every day monotony at times. Without a constant mnemonic I casually forget about the fact that I am simply human. A human, just as the millions before me and the millions after me. It serves as a reminder that I should not carry burden on my shoulder and simply live to expand my knowledge and happiness.

I always wonder where the traveler sitting on the side of the dirt road has come from. What is in that bag that he tosses over his shoulder and carries with him along his adventures? What are his thoughts as he sits turned to the lake and mountains under the shade of a tree? More exciting than that; where is this man headed? My future, like his, is up in the air waiting for the wind to blow it in the right direction.

I am excited for whatever my compass needle decides to show but for now, I know that the IU Art Museum will always have a place for me to come ponder and reflect. It is always comforting when a book seems to have been written about you, or a song sung about your life; but through a painting, the text is written into every brush stroke and the song is sung with every color, bringing out those emotions with an entirely new intensity. These are just my sentiments though and I am only a simple observer sitting at the top of a hill by the side of a dirt road.

Many thanks to Sasha for her contribution. Stay tuned for more stories in “Your Favorite Things.” If you would like to contribute to the series, contact Abe Morris the IU Art Museum’s Manager of Public Relations and Marketing at: abamorri@iu.edu

IU Art Museum’s Light Totem Goes Green!

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In January, solar panels were installed on the roof of the IU Art Museum to generate enough power to offset the electricity used by our iconic sculpture Light Totem, created in 2007 by Rob Shakespeare, IU professor emeritus in Lighting Design. This project was the initiative of the IU Art Museum Green Team led by the efforts of Jeanne Leimkuhler. The project was funded by a grant from the Indiana University Student Sustainability Council, with additional funding provided by Facility Operations, a unit of the Office of the Vice President for Capital Planning and Facilities, and the Office of Sustainability at Indiana University. This project is a tremendous example of collaboration between students, faculty, and staff across multiple departments at Indiana University. We hope that Light Totem can now be seen not only as a shining beacon for the arts at Indiana University, but also as an inspiration for future endeavors to make our campus and world a greener and more sustainable place.

“The request was for a PV [photovoltaic] system that would offset 100% of Light Totem‘s annual energy consumption, which is estimated at 4700kWH. The system installed is estimated to produce 5083kWH annually, so our goal is exceeded.  We will be able to track actual energy production to see if the system performs as expected.”- Eric Goy, Senior Electric Engineer at Indiana University, Facility Operations, a unit of the Office of the Vice President for Capital Planning and Facilities

“There is a lot to like about the project from a sustainability perspective, but I’m particularly impressed by the cross-campus collaboration that allowed this to happen. The project started with the Art Museum’s Green Team proposal to the Student Sustainability Council. After the council voted to fund the project, Vice President of Capital Planning and Facilities Tom Morrison, generously supplemented the council’s contribution, which allowed this project to happen from a financial standpoint. It is a great story of students, faculty, and staff collaborating to bring more renewable energy to IU.”- Andrew Predmore Associate Director of Sustainability, Office of Sustainability, Indiana University

“The Student Sustainability Council is proud to have supported this project with the student sustainability fund. Our member organizations were in unanimous support of this exciting project; it is an iconic part of the Bloomington campus and the project makes a statement about the importance of transitioning to renewable energy use.”- James French, Indiana University Student Sustainability Council

“The Greening of the Light Totem was brought about by the IU student body and now they will know, as they are enjoying the ever-changing colored wall at night, that the sculpture is being powered with clean energy from the sun. As we all move toward a more sustainable energy future, it is exciting to see the IU Art Museum leading the way with this very colorful project.” – Jeanne Leimkuhler, former IU Art Museum Green Team President and Works on Paper Preparator

Photos of the solar panel installation:

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