Alumni Spotlight: Andrew Wang

Andrew Wang photo
Andrew Wang

After graduating from Indiana University with a Master of Arts in art history in 2017 and serving as a graduate assistant at the Eskenazi Museum of Art, Andrew Wang has completed a Kress Fellowship at Yale University and has accepted a new position as Instructional Design Librarian at the Ringling College of Art + Design in Sarasota, Florida. We recently caught up with Andrew to hear more about his experiences at IU and after.

1. Tell us a little bit about your experience at IU and specifically the Eskenazi Museum of Art.

I was the graduate assistant to Jenny McComas, Curator of European and American Art, from 2014 to 2017. I worked on a wide variety of projects during those three years, including regular maintenance of curatorial files and electronic records for the museum’s collections. I also assisted MFA students with the installation of their thesis exhibitions and curated special installations in the galleries.

I saw the museum transform dramatically in just a few short years. Jenny executed a major reinstallation in the first floor gallery, we migrated our data to a new collections management system, the museum was renamed, and David Brenneman joined as the new director.

I worked at the Fine Arts Library throughout my graduate program in the art history department as well, so I practically lived in the building.

Andrew Wang discusses the legacy of Marcel Duchamp’s Readymades at a Noon Talk in 2017.  Photo: Doug Paul Case

2. What was your experience at Yale like?

The Kress Fellowship in Art Librarianship at Yale allowed me to pursue my own independent projects with the support and guidance of leading professionals in the field. I created visual indexes for the Visual Resources Collection, managed a digital exhibition, and designed a user study for Yale’s art history department. I also provided research consultations for students, instructed classes on research methods and information literacy, oversaw the Haas Arts Library’s social media platforms, and organized the annual Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon and rotating thematic book displays. I spent most of my time working at the Arts Library, but I spent one day a week at the Center for British Art so I could gain experience working in a museum library. At the center I conducted a collection analysis project to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the Reference Library’s holdings. The center is involved with so many groundbreaking projects, like the International Image Interoperability Framework.

3. Did you spend much time at the Yale University Art Gallery? How does it compare to the museum here at IU?

I took almost everyone who visited me in New Haven to the Art Gallery, so I ended up spending a lot of time there. Their permanent collection is encyclopedic in scope, like the Eskenazi Museum’s, and the galleries are organized similarly. I think Yale’s Art Gallery has exceptional strengths in its contemporary collection, with works by Gerhard Richter, Barkley L. Hendricks, and Kerry James Marshall, to name a few. They also have Marcel Duchamp’s last painting on canvas, Tu m’, which I loved seeing since Jenny and I had co-curated a special installation in celebration of the centennial of Duchamp’s Fountain. Yale has a larger infrastructure and staff, but the Eskenazi Museum has a competitive collection.

4. Tell us about your new job at the Ringling College of Art + Design.

My new position at Ringling College of Art + Design is Instructional Design Librarian. I was surprised by how much I really loved teaching and conducting research consultations during my time at Yale, and this new position at the Ringling will allow me to focus primarily on those aspects of librarianship. In collaboration with another Instructional Design Librarian (who also happens to be an IU alum!), I will be teaching undergraduate art students how to conduct research and about critical information/visual literacy. In this position I hope to continue to develop public speaking skills while bringing a fresh perspective to library instruction. I want to introduce more engaging activities and relatable analogies to help students take advantage of the resources offered at an academic institution. At the very least, I want students to understand their own agency in their research process and to feel more comfortable approaching librarians for help. I was attracted to this position because the director of the library at the Ringling, Kristina Keogh, was my former supervisor at the IU Fine Arts Library. She encouraged me to pursue so many professional development opportunities as a student, and I always loved working with her. I always said that it would be a dream-come-true scenario to work with her again.

5. How did your experience at IU and the art museum prepare you for post-graduation?

I can’t thank Jenny and the museum’s registrar, Anita Bracalente, enough for the opportunities they gave me at the museum. Working at the museum gave me such a well-rounded perspective on how to serve patrons as an art librarian. I feel as though I have a particularly nuanced understanding of what my patrons need, whether they’re conducting provenance research or just starting to browse the available literature on a new subject. Getting to work so closely with TMS, the museum’s collection management system, helped me better understand metadata standards, which is crucial for efficiently managing projects that are related to digital collections. The Yale Center for British Art also uses TMS, so I felt confident diving straight into my work there.

I think my curatorial experience helped me stand out as a candidate for the Kress Fellowship. At IU I had curated a special installation about Josef Albers’s pedagogy while he was an instructor at Yale, so I had a unique understanding of his legacy in the School of Art’s curricula. Also, working closely with MFA students provided me the opportunity to understand a variety of working processes. I’m especially grateful that Jenny trusted me to work with them.

6. What do you miss about IU and Bloomington the most?

I miss the B-Line/Clear Creek trail and how easy it was to bike everywhere! I made a lot of close friends while I was there, so I plan to visit as soon as I have time. I also find myself craving food from the Owlery and Rainbow Bakery.

7. Are there any areas of research that you are interested in exploring in the future?

I’d like to continue researching queer theory and underground subcultures, but I’m also starting to read more about critical and feminist pedagogy. Right now, I’m working on an essay about comics, their history of censorship, and their current place in academic libraries. My reading list is never-ending, so I’m not sure where my research will take me in the future.

8. Anything else that you would like to add?

I just want to reiterate my thanks to the staff at the museum who supported me throughout grad school. With the relocation of the Fine Arts Library, the renovations at the museum, and the relocation of both the art history and information and library science departments, I might not see the IU I knew as a student when I get the chance to visit in the future, but at least I know that I have a fantastic network of friends, colleagues, and mentors in Bloomington.

IU Eskenazi Museum of Art Website

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Heidi Davis-Soylu Named New Director of Education at the IU Eskenazi Museum of Art

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Heidi Davis-Soylu. Image courtesy of Newfields

The Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University is proud to announce Dr. Heidi Davis-Soylu as its new Lucienne M. Glaubinger Director of Education. Davis-Soylu will begin at the museum on January 11. Most recently, Davis-Soylu was Director of Academic Engagement and Learning Research at Newfields (formerly the Indianapolis Museum of Art). At Newfields she led the academic engagement department, including the St. Mary’s Child Center at the IMA preschool, the Art and Nature Homeschool Cottage (K-middle school), pre-K-12 school programs, docent program, adult and youth studio programs, studio classrooms, summer camps, educator professional development, and student and educator tours. A number of these programs began under Davis-Soylu’s direction, including the launch of the country’s first encyclopedic art museum preschool with a focus on serving children in poverty, and the Art and Nature Homeschool Cottage.

As the new Director of Education, Davis-Soylu will lead the Eskenazi Museum of Art’s education programs at an exciting time in the organization’s history, as it further solidifies its place as one of the preeminent teaching museums in the United States. The museum’s current renovation plans include a new Center for Education, which Davis-Soylu will help envision. And a recently launched school outreach initiative that organized visits by museum docents to every second grade classroom in Monroe County in 2017 will expand in 2018 under her direction.

Davis-Soylu is no stranger to Indiana University. She received both her Master’s and PhD in art education from IU Bloomington, and her bachelor’s in elementary education from IU Southeast. During her time as a graduate student at IU she served as an associate instructor and regularly embedded the Eskenazi Museum of Art into her courses in art education. In 2017, she received the Maris M. and Mary Higgins Proffitt Outstanding Dissertation Fellowship, which is awarded to one candidate each year at the IU School of Education.

“As a university art museum, education is central to what we do at the Eskenazi Museum of Art. We are very excited to welcome someone with Heidi’s expertise and background to lead our education department. This is an important time as we reimagine our museum, and plan for the reopening of our newly renovated building. It is a great pleasure to welcome Heidi to our team,” said David Brenneman, the Wilma E. Kelley Director of the IU Eskenazi Museum of Art.

You can follow news about the museum’s renovation and activities during this exciting period of change at artmuseum.indiana.edu

Eskenazi Museum of Art Hosts Educational Workshop

brab group photo

In June, the education department at the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art hosted Teaching through Visual Arts, a four-day workshop generously funded by the Brabson Library and Educational Foundation. The primary goals of the workshop were to encourage K–12 educators to take the lead in creating pre-visit resource materials and gallery programs and to introduce them to the educational benefits of initiating interdisciplinary and multicultural dialogues through guided visual analyses of original works of art.

The twenty-one participants submitted a proposal around a theme or idea they planned to develop. The education department read the proposals and tailored the workshop sessions around them. Each educator received a binder of museum resources, a stipend to offset expenses, and a voucher for bus transportation to and from the museum for a future gallery session with their students during the 2016–17 academic year.

Educators were grouped into six “teacher teams” according to information drawn from their proposals. An experienced docent from the museum’s Docent Program was matched with each team according to their skills, educational interests, and gallery expertise, serving as the point person throughout the entire workshop. Moureen Coulter, Tina Jernigan, Ilona Richey, Becky Rusie, Kim Simpson, Helena Walsh, and Rich Wolf introduced educators to exercises in guided visual observation, transforming galleries into learning laboratories for enhancing classroom discussions on math, modernism, literature, writing, history, timeline development, social studies, and so forth. With a front row perspective throughout the workshop, the docents will provide presentations that prepare each classroom for their upcoming gallery session.

In addition to exploring all three floors of the museum’s permanent collection, individual teacher teams were treated to an overview of the resources at the Lilly Library, Mathers Museum of World Cultures, and Monroe County History Center, tailored to the themes of their proposal topics. The Indiana Murals of Thomas Hart Benton and the Daily Collection of Hoosier Painting at the IU Auditorium as well as special presentations by Sherry Rouse, curator of campus art, and Nan Brewer, Lucienne M. Glaubinger Curator for Works on Paper, assisted these educators in further identifying objectives in their visual-based lessons.

By the end of the workshop, teachers had made their initial selections of masterworks for the pre-visit resource materials and gallery sessions, listed the objectives of their lesson plans, and made presentations to their peers regarding their plans for art-driven lessons, generating discussion and receiving invaluable feedback.

Evaluations as well as extensive notes taken from these teachers’ presentations will supply essential information for the museum’s education department to compile and edit final drafts of twenty-one new PowerPoints. Each teacher will test and tweak these preparatory materials with their students, while assessing and refining the effectiveness of the gallery session during visits to the museum with their students next academic year.

Ed Maxedon, the museum’s Lucienne M. Glaubinger Curator of Education, states, “The education department believes this pioneering approach to creating K–12 gallery programming will have a multiplying effect, adding new gallery programs annually.  Classroom teachers will be more likely to use this program because they initiated it and have invested their time and expertise. All of these K–12 educators are dedicated, setting aside a week of their summer vacations to try something completely new. Teachers, students, docents and practicum students will add their voices to help determine a quality program.”

Eskenazi Museum of Art Website