The Fountain at 100

fountain
Marcel Duchamp (French, active in the United States 1887-1968). Fountain, 1964 edition (original 1917). Painted ceramic. Partial gift of Mrs. William H. Conroy. Eskenazi Museum of Art 71.37.7

One of the jewels of the Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University’s collection is a complete set of the 1964 edition of Marcel Duchamp’s Readymades. Duchamp was a French artist who was associated with the Dada movement, which sought to redefine traditional artistic practices. During World War I, Duchamp moved to New York City, where he became a central figure in that city’s artistic community. Duchamp’s major contribution to Dada—and to modern art more generally—were the Readymades, mass-produced objects that he presented as works of art. Duchamp undermined the original functionality of the objects through slight alterations or by installing them in an unusual way. By emphasizing an intellectual approach to art over craftmanship or stylistic expressivity, Duchamp posed a serious challenge to long-accepted definitions of art. His radical thinking of artistic practice inspired the development of conceptual art and the use of nontraditional materials within the realm of fine art.

The year 2017 marks the centennial of Fountain, the most famous—and notorious—Readymade. One hundred years ago, in April 1917, the Society of Independent Artists in New York refused to display Fountain—a urinal turned on its back and signed “R. Mutt”—in its annual exhibition. Because Fountain and many other original Readymades were lost not long after their creation, Duchamp and the Milan gallerist Arturo Schwartz decided to produce a replica edition of these works in 1964. The reproduction of the Readymades acknowledged their significance to the development of modern art. The Eskenazi Museum of Art is one of only three museums worldwide that holds all thirteen Readymades reproduced in the 1964 edition. The installation Fountain at 100 celebrates the Readymades, with special emphasis on Fountain, on view in the museum’s first floor Gallery of Art of the Western World from January 24 through May 7, 2017. Works by artists inspired by Duchamp—Man Ray, Joseph Cornell, and Lucas Samaras—will also be on view. We hope you take this opportunity to visit and see Duchamp’s Readymades in person for yourself.

The Eskenazi Museum of Art will also be hosting a free Noon Talk on February 15, 2017 from 12:15-1:00 p.m. entitled “Out of the Box: The Legacy of the Readymade,” presented in conjunction with Fountain at 100. Andrew Wang, graduate assistant for European and American art, will discuss the influence of Marcel Duchamp’s Readymades on Jospeh Cornell, Louise Nevelson, and Lucas Samaras. This Noon Talk will take place in the Gallery of the Art of the Western World, first floor, and is free and open to the public. No prior reservation is necessary to attend.

Please visit the Eskenazi Museum of Art’s Website for gallery hours and more information on visiting the museum. Admission at the Eskenazi Museum of Art is always FREE. 

 

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Your Favorite Things: Lydia Schmitt and Pablo Picasso’s The Studio

lydia3Lydia Schmitt and Pablo Picasso’s The Studio

This is the second installment of a new series in which students, community members, and staff share their favorite works at the IU Art Museum. This week’s feature is by Lydia Schmitt, a freshman at IU Bloomington majoring in Arts Management with minors in Art History and English. Lydia selected Pablo Picasso’s oil painting The Studio (1934), which is on permanent display in the museum’s first floor Gallery of the Art of the Western World. Here is what she had to say:

I vividly remember the first time I saw it. It was welcome week of my freshman year and my friends and I had spent the whole day exploring IU’s campus when I finally convinced them to go to the art museum with me. I was pumped to see what the museum had and they were excited for the air conditioning.

I could hardly contain my excitement as we explored the different galleries. We passed different pieces, each of us trying to recall facts we had learned in art history classes. I remember thinking it couldn’t get any better, and then I saw it. We were rounding the end of the first floor exhibit and as my friends and I were joking about Marcel Duchamp’s urinal (Duchamp’s famous Readymade statue, The Fountain), I caught a glimpse. I couldn’t even believe it. A Picasso? Here? I made a beeline for it.

I stood in front of The Studio mouth agape while my friends quickly followed behind me. A choir of “I don’t see it” ascended. “Well look at this, and this, and look at how these connect to make this,” I explained while frantically gesturing with my arms trying to make them get it. After every explanation I tried to give, I kept seeing new parts of the painting connect. It was like building a puzzle. I was mystified and would have been able to sit there the rest of the day just figuring it out and piecing it together.

Months later, and I am still entranced by Picasso’s The Studio. What an amazing blessing it is to have such impressive pieces here at Indiana University’s art museum. I frequently visit the museum just to sit and stare at this painting. It’s like visiting an old friend but I’m still able to learn something new about it every time.

Many thanks to Lydia for her contribution. If you would like to share your favorite work, please contact Abe Morris, the IU Art Museum’s Manager of Public Relations and Marketing, at: abamorri@iu.edu