New Acquisitions of Works by Female Artists

We continue to be very active while our museum building is undergoing renovation. This includes acquiring new works for our permanent collection. We have recently added a number of interesting pieces by some phenomenal women artists. Here are a few of our recent acquisitions.

 

Resurrection Story with Patrons by Kara Walker

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Kara Walker (American, b. 1969). Resurrection Story with Patrons, 2017. Etching with aquatint, sugar-lift, spit-bite, and drypoint on paper, frames (left and right): 42 x 32 in.; (center): 42 x 51 in. Museum purchase with funds from Paula W. Sunderman, Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University, 2017.81

This new triptych by Kara Walker reflects the complexities of her narratives and her use of the print medium. Walker emerged on the international art scene with paper silhouettes of the antebellum atrocities of slavery. Resurrection Story with Patrons continues to explore contemporary issues of race through references to the historical past. While a 2016 resident at the American Academy in Rome, Walker reflected on the police killings of young black men and social unrest back home. Drawing on iconography of Christian martyrdom from Western European artistic traditions and contemplating the challenges of erecting monuments and memorials, she created a resurrection story that she says alternates between captor and redeemer. In the central panel, a half-length nude black woman is pulled up by ropes with her back supported by a man and a baby. The standing figure on the right suggests an African chief with ceremonial staff, while the wooden boards recall the hull of a slave ship or the cross. The ghostlike figures in the wings—reminiscent of wealthy patrons in medieval and Renaissance altarpieces— are actually black house servants. The great colossus serves as a tribute to the souls of slaves lost in the Middle Passage and to the power of collective memory.

 

Seated Figure with Hands in Head by Elizabeth Catlett

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Elizabeth Catlett (American, active in Mexico, 1915-2012). Seated Figure with Hands in Head, 1982. Bronze. Museum purchase with funds from Donald, Nicole, and Dexter Griffin; Janice and Mary Wiggins; and the Estate of Herman B Wells via the Joseph Granville and Anna Bernice Wells Memorial Fund, Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University, 2017.62

With the acquisition of this sculpture, the Eskenazi Museum of Art adds a work by one of the most significant American artists of the twentieth century to its collection. Born in Washington, DC, Elizabeth Catlett studied at Howard University and at the University of Iowa with renowned regionalist painter Grant Wood, who encouraged her to develop her talents as a sculptor. Frustrated by the limited opportunities available for African Americans in the United States, Catlett moved to Mexico City in 1946, and became a Mexican citizen in 1962. The politically and socially engaged prints she produced at Mexico City’s Taller de Gráfica Popular have become icons of twentieth-century art, and they reflect her activism in support of the civil rights movement in the United States and against human rights abuses in Latin America. Catlett’s sculptures often portray archetypal African or African American women, either alone or with children. The intimately sized sculpture now in the museum’s collection is posed in a manner that recalls traditional Western depictions of melancholy (as in Albrecht Dürer’s famous engraving Melancholia), but the solidity of the figure’s limbs suggests strength, and her mask-like face hints at resolve while also referencing African art.

Falcon by Kiki Smith

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Kiki Smith (American, born Germany, 1954). Falcon, 2001. Aquatint and etching on paper. Museum purchase with funds from the Elisabeth P. Myers Art Acquisition Endowment,
Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University, 2016.122

Although recognized as a sculptor and installation artist, Kiki Smith is also known as a printmaker, particularly for her realistic images based on dead animals. The museum’s collection already included several smaller works by Smith, but Falcon (2001) is our first major print by the artist. For this large-scale image, Smith used an intaglio technique to carefully render the bird’s feathers and to create a haunting, macabre effect through the inclusion of a solid black hood over the bird’s head and flowing tendrils.

If you enjoy these works you can explore more art from our collection at our Highlights from the Collection website. You can also sign up for our monthly email newsletter or bi-annual museum magazine at our website: artmuseum.indiana.edu

 

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Spotlights: Two Recent Acquisitions On View in French Sculpture Collection

84.10Image: Jacques Lipchitz (French, born Lithuania, 1891-1973). Harlequin with Guitar, 1926. Bronze. Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Henry R. Hope, 84.10

This summer the Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University is offering a special exhibition called Spotlights: Five Views into the Eskenazi Museum of Art’s Collection, on view June 11-September 4, 2016. In this exhibition each of the museum’s five curators has chosen a group of objects to highlight due to their rarity, research interest, or importance, as a way of further displaying the range and quality that make the museum’s collection among the best in the country. You can find an overview of the exhibition HERE, and we will be taking a deeper look at the individual collections “spotlighted” here on the blog this summer. This week we focus on a collection of French sculpture curated by Jenny McComas, the museum’s Curator of European and American Art.

Between the late nineteenth and mid-twentieth century, Paris was the birthplace of avant-garde movements such as Fauvism, Cubism, and Surrealism. While the paintings associated with these movements are well known, sculpture, too, played a significant role in the development of modern French art. The Eskenazi Museum of Art has a strong collection of sculptures by artists who were active in France during this time. While some of these works are always on view in the museum’s permanent gallery, this exhibition offers an expanded survey of our holdings in this area, including two new acquisitions, which you can see below.

2016.1Image: Charles Malfray (French, 1887-1940). Rider Crossing the Marne, 1915. Terracotta. Museum purchase with funds from Estate of Herman B Wells via the Joseph Granville and Anna Bernice Wells Memorial Fund, 2016.1

Charles Malfray’s work blends aspects of classicism and modernism, though many of his subjects referred to his experiences on World War I battlefields. This sculpture may allude to the First Battle of the Marne, which took place in September 1914. Possibly a model for a larger work, this terracotta reveals the spontaneity of Malfray’s working process.

2016.2Image: Marcel Damboise (French 1903-1992). Peasant (La Paysanne), 1938-39. Stone. Gift of Danielle Damboise Françoise, daughter of the artist, 2016.2

Born in Marseilles, Marcel Damboise apprenticed with a stonecutter before moving to Paris to pursue sculpture. Damboise’s work is characterized by a respect for traditional forms and subjects. He also conveyed a sense of modernity by simplifying forms and giving prominence to the mark of the artist’s hand—as evidenced by the patterning carved into this sculpture’s surface. This beautiful work was a generous gift to our museum from the daughter of the artist.

The other sculptures on view as part of our Spotlights exhibition range from the figurative, classicizing sculptures of Auguste Rodin and Aristide Maillol to more experimental works by the Cubist Henri Laurens and the Surrealist Marcel Jean. As the center of the art world, Paris also attracted artists from around the globe. Some of these immigrants—including Jacques Lipchitz, born to a Jewish family in Lithuania; Alexander Archipenko, a native of Ukraine; and Julio González from Barcelona—were among the most important contributors to the development of French modernism, drawing both on their diverse backgrounds and their enthusiasm for Parisian culture. We hope you take the opportunity to visit the museum and see the full collection on view through September 4, 2016. Admission to the Eskenazi Museum of Art is always FREE. If you have any questions, please contact us at iuam@indiana.edu.

If you would like to learn more about French Sculpture visit the French Sculpture Census website.

Eskenazi Museum of Art Website